2 March 2018

What has journalism got to do with it?

We, the poor Bengalis, have been denied of a “V” in our scripts. It is usually replaced with a “B”. Much to the chagrin of every non-Bengali! For all of you know, we were destined to be the “Vengalis” till God’s proofreader forgot to put in the letter “V” in our script! Other than that peculiar accent of ours, it can also land us in some very interesting situations – especially in a country like the USA.

For example, I recently overheard an indignant daughter yelling on her phone to her mother – “CVS? Why would you think I have applied for a job to CVS? I am studying Journalism, mother! I have applied to CBS. “C” “B” “S” – the news channel”.

“Oh”!, said the mother as I shimmied away to another room before I could be spotted overhearing the conversation.

I am not suggesting that this happened in our house.

But then again, I am not expressly denying it either 🙂



Posted March 2, 2018 by Rajib Roy in category "Humor

24 COMMENTS :

  1. By Srijan Sengupta on

    My first job during undergrad was as a summer intern at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (often abbreviated as HP) and my mom was rather surprised that after learning statistics I was going to work for Hindustan Petroleum (also abbreviated as HP). 😀 😀

    Reply
    1. By Rajib Roy on

      At least your dad did not ask why you are joining the cops…. I had to explain that I am joining “Citicorp” not “Citicop”

      Reply
  2. By Subramanian Subramanian on

    I was in Kolkata from 1988-91 staying with my natchmate Vinod Menon. Once in a way I used to book train tickets through agent our company used. On phone I used to tell him,” Vinod Menon”. The agent would respond, “B as in Bombay ?” and I used to clarify,” No. B as in bictory.” Vinod used to tell me his name was always spelt properly by our company agent

    Reply
  3. By Narayan Venkatasubramanyan on

    A neighboring dorm had a Bala Venky and a V Venkatesh. When a stranger walked in and asked for Venky, a fellow resident who happened to be Bengali asked “B Benky or B Benky?” No, I’m not making this up.

    Reply
    1. By Rajib Roy on

      Did you hear about the Bengali who came back home after renting a car and upon asked by wife – “Ki gaari peley?” (what rental car did you get), he assured her “Bolbo Bolbo” 🙂 🙂

      Reply
    1. By Vasumathi Sriganesh on

      And one day we had a serious discussion on the letters V and B
      Our teacher said – you know that drink (beverage) – Bhibha? (for Viva)
      Others say – with difficulty – “Uwee-Uwaa”. We simply say Bhibha

      Reply
    2. By Vasumathi Sriganesh on

      And one day we had a serious discussion on the letters V and B
      Our teacher said – you know that drink (beverage) – Bhibha? (for Viva)
      Others say – with difficulty – “Uwee-Uwaa”. We simply say Bhibha

      Reply
    3. By Vasumathi Sriganesh on

      And one day we had a serious discussion on the letters V and B
      Our teacher said – you know that drink (beverage) – Bhibha? (for Viva)
      Others say – with difficulty – “Uwee-Uwaa”. We simply say Bhibha

      Reply
  4. By Anamika Chatterjee on

    In the meantime there is a colleague at work whose last name is Potti. I am doing all I can to let that person be. Feel really sorry though.

    Reply
  5. By Somnath Daripa on

    Actually, Sri Ganesh when pronounced in Sanskrit where it came from will sound very different from what a British or an American would pronounce. In fact it’s a problem with the English language that it does not have sounds which we find in other languages – and the reverse also applies. I think, the joke is on us, who while aligning with the shortcoming of English, make fun of other languages, when our identities(names) were meant to sound differently 😉

    Reply
  6. By Sunny Sanyal on

    Interesting… My family seems to emphasize the “B” even more strongly with “BH” as in “bhery gud”. In general the letter V seems to be broadly problematic.
    I grew up in Mumbai where some are apt to say (and hear) “Wolwo” instead of “Volvo”. In addition, the letter O seems to be optional and can be dropped which produces “Wiktry” instead of “Victory”

    Reply
  7. By Somshekhar Baksi on

    It took me time to realise that “Beeva” (a brand of saree, I think) was actually Bangla for “Vibha”. And I am Bengali.

    Reply
  8. By Avinash Misra on

    that reminds me that the chinese have been denied the R – so i had to tell the taxi guy in Shenzhen to take me to WallMAA

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.