30 November 2017

Word puzzle: Birds of a feather…

Some of the most interesting revelations I had the other day was trying to learn the collective nouns of birds. I am sure you have heard a “murder” of crows is the proper way to describe a bunch of crows. I thought a “parliament” of owls was a hoot – ha ha!

Try these.

1. A _ of eagles
2. A _ of falcons
3. A _ of hens
4. A _ of nightingales
5. A _ of parrots
6. A _ of pelicans
7. A _ of sparrows
8. A _ of storks
9. A _ of turkeys
10. A _ of woodpeckers

11. Here is a bonus question: What is the difference between a “gaggle” of geese and a “skein” of geese? Take a guess. If it helps, it is the same difference as a “committee” of vultures and a “kettle” of vultures!!!

Now Google the answers… how many did you get?

[I will post the answers in 24 hours]



Posted November 30, 2017 by rajibroy in category "Word Play

9 COMMENTS :

  1. Soma Das BagBy Soma Das Bag on

    OMG..:)
    1.A congress of eagles.
    2.A cast of falcons.
    3.A brood of hens.
    4.A watch of nightingales.
    5.A company of parrots.
    6.A scoop of pelican.
    7.A quarrel of sparrows.
    8.A phalanx of storks.
    9.A raffle of turkeys.
    10.A descent of woodpeckers.
    🙂 🙂 🙂

    Reply
  2. Rajib RoyBy Rajib Roy on

    Now for the answers. First off, I am totally impressed by Soma’s knowledge. Frankly, I would have gotten no more than 2 of them without consulting Google!!

    Second, let’s start with the bonus question. Did you know that there are different collective nouns to describe the same bird depending on what they are doing? Apparently it is a “gaggle” of geese when they are on land but “skein” of geese when they are flying. Similarly, it is a “committee” of vultures if they are all perched upon trees or are on the ground but moment they take flight, they are a “kettle” of vultures.

    A “convocation” of eagles (Soma’s answer of “congress” is acceptable; it is not very commonly used, but should be accepted. Also uncommonly used are “aerie” and “army”)

    A “cast” of falcons

    A “brood” of hens

    A “watch” of nightingales (I had to scratch my head on this one)

    A “pandemonium” of parrots (First, Soma’s answer of “company” is acceptable too. Second, I am laughing my head off thinking about how apt “pandemonium” is to describe a particularly garrulous bunch of birds)

    A “pod” of pelicans (again, Soma’s answer of “scoop” should be accepted – although that is a rare use as is “bring”, “squadron” and “pouch”)

    A “host” of sparrows (I remember in India, we were taught a “quarrel” of sparrows – Soma is right on that count)

    A “mustering or muster” of storks (I am trying to find the source of “phalanx” that Soma has used. I need some more time to research where it was used)

    A “rafter” of turkeys (Soma wrote “raffle”, I assume that was a auto correct from rafter. Also “gang” is acceptable)

    A “descent” of woodpeckers.�
    I do not know about you. But I learnt a lot that day!!!

    Reply
  3. By rajibroy (Post author) on

    Now for the answers. First off, I am totally impressed by Soma’s knowledge. Frankly, I would have gotten no more than 2 of them without consulting Google!!

    Second, let’s start with the bonus question. Did you know that there are different collective nouns to describe the same bird depending on what they are doing? Apparently it is a “gaggle” of geese when they are on land but “skein” of geese when they are flying. Similarly, it is a “committee” of vultures if they are all perched upon trees or are on the ground but moment they take flight, they are a “kettle” of vultures.

    A “convocation” of eagles (Soma’s answer of “congress” is acceptable; it is not very commonly used, but should be accepted. Also uncommonly used are “aerie” and “army”)

    A “cast” of falcons

    A “brood” of hens

    A “watch” of nightingales (I had to scratch my head on this one)

    A “pandemonium” of parrots (First, Soma’s answer of “company” is acceptable too. Second, I am laughing my head off thinking about how apt “pandemonium” is to describe a particularly garrulous bunch of birds)

    A “pod” of pelicans (again, Soma’s answer of “scoop” should be accepted – although that is a rare use as is “bring”, “squadron” and “pouch”)

    A “host” of sparrows (I remember in India, we were taught a “quarrel” of sparrows – Soma is right on that count)

    A “mustering or muster” of storks (I am trying to find the source of “phalanx” that Soma has used. I need some more time to research where it was used)

    A “rafter” of turkeys (Soma wrote “raffle”, I assume that was a auto correct from rafter. Also “gang” is acceptable)

    A “descent” of woodpeckers.

    I do not know about you. But I learnt a lot that day!!!

    Reply
  4. Soma Das BagBy Soma Das Bag on

    Very nicely explained Rajib…..all these are in use in English language…
    Exercised once more all these school knowledges..for your question…:) 🙂
    Thanks for explaining.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.